Is the Opioid Crisis Worse Than We Thought?

New research on the opioid crisis published by Addiction journal shows that the opioid epidemic’s numbers are as much as shows that overdose deaths might be as much as 28% higher than previously reported. A significant number of deaths may have been left out of reporting for several years.

Where Are The Unreported Deaths?

In Alabama, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, and Indiana, the actual final numbers of deaths may have been previously underreported by as much as 50%.

Nearly 72% of “unclassified drug overdoses” that occurred between 1999-2016 involved prescription opioids, heroin, or fentanyl. However, due to the victims having other drugs in their systems, they are marked as “unclassified”, even if it’s most likely that the opioids killed that person. For example, a person with Oxycontin and marijuana in their system might have their death left unclassified, even if it’s …

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Slight Drop in Prescription Drug Abuse among Young Adults

Prescription drug abuse in the U.S. has dropped to the lowest level since 2002, reflecting a crackdown on over-prescribing doctors and black market drug dealers.

Prescription drugs are no longer being abused quite as prominently as they once were, especially by young adults. In fact, the
abuse of prescription drugs dropped to the lowest level since 2002

. Experts are crediting the drop in drug abuse to crackdowns at federal and state levels on doctors who offer prescriptions for profit and on patients who have obtained drugs by visiting pill mills and doctor shopping.

Young adults, who were among the largest group of abusers of prescription drugs, have also showed the greatest drop in abuse. The number of young adults, defined as those between the ages of 18 to 25, who regularly abused prescription drugs went from 1.9 million to …

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Prescription for Death – The Transition from Oxy to Heroin

The leading cause of accidental death in the United States is prescription drug abuse. Prescription drugs are responsible for more deaths than heroin and cocaine combined, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Painkillers like OxyNEO which contains oxycodone, are actually derived from the opium poppy. They are just as addictive as their heroin. People that would never dream of doing heroin, are okay with taking a pill – especially one that comes from a doctor. That’s one of the reasons so many have become addicted to opioids in the past decade. They seem harmless in the beginning. OxyNEO is meant to be a continuous release drug, and has some very sophisticated ingredients which make it difficult to abuse (by crushing up to snort or inject). OxyNEO’s predecessor OxyContin was commonly crushed up to facilitate getting a massive …

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More Info on PDM or Prescription Drug Misuse

Prescription medication misuse –accurately called “misuse” or PDM – by adolescents, early adults and mature adults is a mounting issue in California and the country.

Prescription medications that are misused or taken for non-medical motives may change brain activity and cause addiction. Of course, OxyNEO is a frequently misused medication but there are many others that fall into the following categories:

– opioids (regularly given to relieve discomfort)

– central nervous system depressants (regularly given to relieve anxiety and sleep conditions)

– stimulants (given to relieve narcolepsy, ADHD, and obesity).

Continuing usage of opioids may lead to physical need and dependence. Used in excessive quantities, stimulants may lead to habitual usage, paranoia, fatally elevated body fevers, and irregular heartbeat.
In 2006, 16.2 million Americans had used a prescription tranquilizer, pain reliever, sedative, or stimulant for non-medical reasons at minimum on …

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OxyNEO News and Updates – The Word on the Street

We’re watching the ticker for news about OxyNEO and a few recurring themes are popping up.

1. OxyContin Users are Not Happy With OxyNEO

The slow release and apparent stomach irritating formulation of oxycodone known as OxyNEO

is apparently not “sitting well” with those who are used to the effects of OxyContin. We’ve been monitoring forums where users are frequently searching for alternatives to OxyNEO (some alternatives that have been mentioned are OxyIR and Fentanyl).

2. Alternative Drugs are Being Sought out

Of course, the black market is where a lot of the opiate trade goes down and apparently in Canada the popularity of Fentanyl is off the charts as OxyNEO (the “tamper proof” replacement for OxyContin) is not a preferred “high.”

3. Heroin is Filling the OxyContin Void

As always, we expect an increase in heroin use and abuse …

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