U.S. Justice Department Joins Suboxone Lawsuit

The U.S. Justice Department has joined a lawsuit alongside several whistleblowers that alleges that the companies marketed off-label and higher dosages than approved, as well as other deception. Several ex-workers are in the process of suing on behalf of the government, as whistleblower laws allow. It appears the government is now up to speed on the wrongs listed in lawsuits against Indivior Plc. and Reckitt Benckiser Group PLC, both involved in marketing the opioid addiction treatment Suboxone.

What is the Lawsuit About?

One of the complaints unsealed on Aug. 2 was filed by former Reckitt employee Ann Marie Williams, claiming that the companies marketed unapproved dosages and uses of Suboxone and Subutex. Williams Reckitt made misleading claims to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to obtain approval for a dissolvable film version of Suboxone.

The lawsuits were filed under the …

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Dark Web Drug Dealers Say They’ve Banned Fentanyl

Owners of websites on the dark web say that they’ve decided to voluntarily ban fentanyl, according to the National Crime Agency based in the UK. The “open air” online drug outlets have done this in a bid to avoid additional scrutiny as reports from the US, and the UK show that fentanyl is now causing the most overdose deaths each year.

In the UK alone, 180 deaths in 18 months were attributed to fentanyl, while in the US, fentanyl overdoses doubled in 2016 to outpace heroin and Oxycontin.

Several large drug-dealing websites have also quietly“de-listed” fentanyl because they don’t want to be investigated when there is an overdose death, according to Vince O’Brien, an investigator at the UK National Crime Agency.

So-called dark web markets have popped up in recent years and have become a reliable source for drug dealers …

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Pharm Companies Search for Safer Pain Relief Solutions

The addiction epidemic in America is still raging, with a record 72,000 overdose deaths according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control for 2017. The pharmaceutical industry has been slow to respond to the numbers. However, the increased scrutiny has made the industry do a double-take regarding profitability. With lawsuits stemming from nearly every state in the US, profits for opioids seem to be on a steady decline. And with the decrease in prescribing, doctors have worried that legitimate chronic pain patients will be left without treatment. New research is now in progress to find new pain drugs that prevent chronically ill people from being neglected or left behind due to opioid unavailability.

Multiple research groups have been tasked with the creation of less dangerous and less addictive opioid development. While they also are focusing on changing the opioids …

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South Carolina Announces Emergency Response Plan for Opioids

Last Wednesday, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster announced that he had created a state emergency response plan to tackle the chronic and ongoing opioid epidemic.

The plan was created with the input of more than 24 organizations and outlines strategies to support state and local efforts. In December 2017, Gov. McMaster first began formulating a plan to combat opioids by issuing a public health emergency.

The governor’s emergency declaration brought together state officials, private partners, and law enforcement to utilize the emergency management infrastructure to combat the growing epidemic or opioid deaths, addiction, and abuse.

The new plan calls for better record-keeping in the medical community and addiction-related opioid training. Physicians will be expected to have opioid-informed conversations with their patients and understanding other pain treatment options. This should help raise awareness of the dangers of opioid use, and help …

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Opioid Ravaged States Turn to Addiction Outreach

Sometimes simple actions are powerful in the fight against opioid addiction. Across the US, programs meant to help people with substance abuse disorders have cropped up on a local level. One such way is through outreach programs in some of the areas where opioid addiction rages. An innovative addiction outreach program in Dover, New Hampshire reaches out to people, both clean and trying to get clean, and asks them how they’re doing. The program, aptly named the Telephone Recovery Support service (TRSS), says they make over 200 phone calls every week to support people who can’t make it to meetings or are unable to get a bed in treatment.

TRSS volunteers make phone calls to people who can’t get out to one of the recovery centers or other meetings with their peers. Some people who can’t get out are homebound …

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